About
Gilded Age Stage

WE TELL IT LIKE IT IS.

Mark Twain coined the term "The Gilded Age" to describe the United States in the late 1800's. The glittering wealth of some thinly gilded the reality of most - poor working conditions, poverty, and racial injustice. Twain is as relevant as ever. It is Gilded Age Stage's mission to bring real people from both ends of this spectrum to life on stage.

Take a seat and get to know an intriguing person from the past...and sometimes, a person from the present with an intriguing past! Our inaugural show features Hannibal's own Margaret Tobin (Molly) Brown, the extraordinary woman beyond the Titanic's most famous survivor.

Gilded Age Stage is based in Hannibal, MO. Shows are available for your group, school, or event in Hannibal and beyond! Please contact us to learn more.
 

ABOUT ERIN KELLEY

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Erin Kelley is the founder and artistic director of Gilded Age Stage. Originally from Tulsa, Oklahoma, she is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation and Shawnee (direct descendant of Tecumseh), and has been a professional theatre artist for over 35 years. An actor, playwright and producer, she has been based in St. Louis, Chicago, and New York City. Her first solo show, "Portrait of My People," received a Kevin Kline Award nomination and has been performed at leading cultural institutions. Erin's career began aboard the Goldenrod Showboat in St. Louis, so it is only fitting she would make her way back to the Mississippi to become a Hannibalian in 2019.

 

To learn more about Erin, please visit: www.erinkelleyactor.com

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Land Acknowledgement

Gilded Age Stage in Hannibal, MO, stands on the original homelands of Indigenous people – Sac and Fox, Illinois, Ojibwe (Chippewa), and Osage. The Mississippi River, which flows only short blocks from downtown Hannibal, was called the Misiziibi (Great River) by the Ojibwe. We recognize and honor all Indigenous people for their skill, resilience, and love and stewardship of all land and water, and encourage you to learn about and connect with the Indigenous people in your area. Native people are still here!